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The Flying Cloud, R-505 by Paul Gazis

Set in a world of the 1920’s that might have been, this is a tale of airships, adventure, gallant gentlemen, and sultry island maidens. . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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Zeppelins are What Dreams are Made of by Michal Wojcik

A Pulp Adventure in Three Parts

Follow the adventures of dimension-hopping bounty hunter Jennifer Asten as she cuts a bloody swathe of destruction across Earth 45, a world where Napoleon won the Battle of Waterloo and airships are a pervasive form of transportation. Includes ninjas, ballerinas, battle zeppelins, bureaucrats, automatons, giant armoured locomotives . . . and perhaps even a dash of romance. . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes thrice weekly.
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Random Editorial Review

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THE FLYING CLOUD, R-505

Adventures in a Dirigible

By Linda Schoales, editor

Oct 8, 2009: “The Flying Cloud, R-505” is the story of the surviving members of the crew of His Majesty’s Airship “Flying Lady”. It’s 1926, but in this alternate reality dirigibles were developed instead of airplanes. After the “Flying Lady” is attacked over the Pacific by an airship flying false colours, the gallant crew work together to keep the remains of their airship aloft long enough to reach land.

The story jumps right in with the crew clinging to the wreckage as it falls [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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THE FLYING CLOUD, R-505

Light, fun, and definitely worth a look

By Von, member

Nov 26, 2009: I have just read a few chapters of this story, and am finding it a fun read; without a hint of vampires, werewolves, or any other such modern fascinations.

I enjoy the Wodehouseque British humor, and the light characterization of the various minor characters.

I vastly enjoy the way he keeps various minor humor elements going throughout . . . two men who bet over anything, a propensity to characterize foreign nationals in interesting [more . . .]

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