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ACTIVATED

Editor’s First Impression

By Chris Poirier, editor

Aug 23, 2011: Gives too much focus to "gee, cool" elements of the world’s magic system ("programming", done by "programmers") and physical descriptions of characters, and not enough focus to character development. Not a story that will transcend its "young adult" tag.

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CHILDREN OF THE APOCALYPSE

Keeping me reading

By C J Edwards, member

Jun 1, 2010: So far this story seems to be aimed at a younger audience that what I fall into, but after reading the first chapter I have to say I want to read the second. I need to know why Genevieve is being followed. Aside from a few very minor things the writing is very solid and like I said, I will be reading more because I need to know what happens next. As long as I need to know what happens next I will keep reading.

Some of the teacher student interaction seemed a bit much in the first chapter. Are teachers really that mean? I know it has been a while since I was in highschool but if a teacher treated my child that way we would have words. Also some of the dialogue between Gen and her friends was a little confusing and hard to follow. Sometimes dialogue would appear without any indication as to who is speaking. This can pull you out of the story a little bit, but it is a minor issue and easily fixed.

I will be interested to see how the next couple of chapters come togeather.

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ASA KRAIYA

If you like character-driven/personal development stories, this is for you!

By capriox, member

Dec 10, 2009: This story is the sequel to the Philosopher in Arms (also listed on WFG). asa kraiya can be read as a standalone, but both stories are equally great reads, so it’s worth it to go read PiA first.

I love this story. Karen has LOTS AND LOTS of writing experience, fiction and nonfiction, and it shows in the polished quality of her writing. It makes it easy to devour each post and then at the end, still be wanting more.

This story is about the personal transformation of Chevenga, the hero from PiA. For those of you who haven’t read PiA, it’s a far-future tale, but post-apocalypse technology loss means it has a "swords and horses" setting. Chevenga is the semanakraseye, the leader of the extremely democratic people of Yeola-e (motto: always, you choose). Although the position is generally inherited, he is NOT a king, despite what his foriegn peers may think. In fact, the Yeolis have a saying that the semanakraseye is the only slave in their nation, because he or she dedicates their whole life and being to serving the will of the people.

Unfortunately for Chevenga, being raised to fulfill that position, combined with the loss of his father at age seven, a vision of personal doom that he keeps secret, and all the other things that happen to him in PiA (short non-spoiler version: LOTS OF TRAUMA, physical and mental, along the way of doing huge amounts of great things for his people and the world) have left him a bit scarred in body and mind.

In asa kraiya, it’s time for Chevenga to heal.

Although there is humor, romance, sex, occasional sword-fighting, high-powered politics and a few side plots to mix things up, this is primarily a very personal story about Chevenga and his internal sea-change. If you don’t enjoy stories unless something is blowing up or there’s a big fight scene every third chapter, you might not like this. For everyone else, I can’t recommend asa kraiya (along with PiA) enough.

ETA: grammatical errors 12/12

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