more . . .

Member Picks   full list  surprise me 

overall 14 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
editor average: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

City of Roses by Kip Manley

A Serialized Phantastick on The Ten Thousand Things & The One True Only

City of Roses is about what happens when Jo Maguire, a highly strung underemployed telemarketer, meets Ysabel Perry, a princess of unspecifiable pedigree. It’s also about hearts broken cleanly and otherwise, the City of Portland, Spenser, those moments in pop songs when the bass and all of the drums except maybe a handclap suddenly drop out of the bridge leaving . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes sporadically.  Recommended by amber simmons and 2 other members.
· · · · · · · ·



Random Editorial Review

the_author() rating onrating onrating onrating offrating off

OYSTERS, PEARLS AND MAGIC

an original premise

By A. M. Harte, editor, author of Theatre of Horrors

Sep 4, 2009: I only read the prologue (which stands at a lengthy 4,000 words!) but my initial impression is that Oysters, Pearls and Magic has an intriguing premise.

It is based in an alternate universe, a place where gender roles are strictly defined: women fish for oysters and pearls, and men "curl light" (or cast magic) to power the boats and so on. The author has clearly given the setting a lot of thought, and the writing strongly evokes a small fishing village. [more . . .]

More editorial reviews . . .

Random Member Review

the_author() rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

CITY OF ROSES

Fairies invade my hometown! eek!

By MeiLin Miranda, author of The Machine God

Dec 6, 2009: I just started reading this, primarily because it’s set in my hometown of Portland. I’m not very far in, but I’m already hooked.

Con: It’s written in present tense, which is hard to pull off and usually annoys me.

Pro: Kip’s pulling it off, using it to write cinematically rather than dramatically, if that makes any sense.

If ever a town could plausibly [more . . .]

More reviews . . .