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Tapestry by Lucy Weaver

a tale of empire

The intense, complicated, intriguing, journal of a noble lady. . . .

An ongoing blogfic, with new posts infrequently.
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Dragomir’s Diary by Matt Bird

Dragomir’s just a normal guy with a normal job as a normal guard in a . . . castle. Unfortunately, nothing else about his life is normal, and he struggles to keep afloat while a fantasy world full of mad kings, vicious elephants, scheming politicians, bloodthirsty one-year-olds and secretive rats burbles around him. Also, his diary smiles. Cheerfully! Join Dragomir as he . . .

An ongoing blogfic, with new posts Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
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Giant Girl Rampages by Melly Mills

Melly Mills is very tall. Freakishly impossibly tall. Basketball hoops come up to her hips, and most people are only a bit taller than her knees. She looks down on giraffes, and has to bend down to peek into a second-story window. Melly’s parents kept her sheltered view in the middle acres of their family farm until they died . . .

A blogfic, with no recent updates.
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Steampunk Alchemist by Tara Miller

The Adventures and Musings of Ms. Angelica Boron

After her herbalist mother’s death, middle aged Ms. Angelica Boron sells her family farm. She moves to St. Louis, Missouri and is immersed in a world of steam autos, Datamancer computers, and a blue haired tinker. Readers can interact with Angelica, becoming part of the story, as she explores alchemy, occult mysteries, and the missing half of her attic. . . .

An abandoned blogfic.
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Thereamid by Thereamid

Never call them faeries

Every folklore tradition in Europe seems to have stories about the time when the Fair Folk left for a land across the sea. Two best friends are about to discover where they went. The main story is told through a trunk of character blogs, and can be enjoyed by itself, but there is a supplemental wiki that branches out . . .

An abandoned blogfic.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating offrating offrating off

Korber’s Reflections by d. fay

The journal of korber ap grumbly, a greater apprentice in the crafting of Eoc’s Blood. His wife is dead, his best friend is dead (they are both melded with him in his mind), and he is being hunted by the society of the elite and his own kind—the terreni. . . .

An abandoned blogfic.
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Random Editorial Review

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TAPESTRY

Not Making the Obvious Choices

By Jim Zoetewey, editor, author of The Legion of Nothing

Jul 23, 2008: When you read a fantasy story set in an empire, you can generally expect certain things.

If the empire is evil, that it will fall due to the actions of the hero of the story.

The hero of the story stands outside of the culture of the empire and has values more like your own.

A massive plot, propelled by epic battles.

[more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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TAPESTRY

Breathtakingly intimate

By MeiLin Miranda, author of The Machine God

Aug 12, 2008: "Tapestry" is, plain and simple, one of the best pieces of web writing out there. It uses the medium better than almost anyone—in fact, I can’t think of anyone who uses the episodic nature of the web serial as well—and Wysteria’s dedication to tone and character in this diary of Suki—Lady Uru— is flawless.

What happens in this serial? Nothing. Everything.

Wysteria paints a thorough portrait from the inside out of a [more . . .]

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