more . . .

by Overall Rank  

overall 21 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
editor average: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off

The Last Skull by Robert C. Rodgers

Teenagers. Super-heroes. Explosions. Time-travel.

After her mother died in a car accident, Sue Daysdale never expected to stumble upon the family secret—that the mild-mannered soccer mom who taught her how to dance, sing, and properly dress a wound was the Skull, one of the most legendary (and terrifying) super-heroes alive. Now, saddled with an unpaid mortgage, a drug-addicted guardian, and a basement full of . . .

A complete novel.
· · · · · · · · · ·

overall 7 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
no editorial rating

Defection by Taulsn

We would appreciate it if time travel, interdimensional invaders, and all the fairies would kindly get stuffed

Alecia is smart, driven, and . . . bored. She is one of the best at what she does, and this is not a good thing given the sheer capacity for chaos she is capable of inciting. Jessica is a dangerous fighter, with a troubled past, voted most likely to shoot up the school. Prysim is very likely the smartest super villain alive, . . .

A complete novel.
· · · · · · ·



Random Editorial Review

No editorial review available.

Random Member Review

the_author() rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

THE LAST SKULL

Gritty? check. Dark? check. Worth reading? CHECK

By G.S. Williams, author of No Man An Island

Jun 29, 2010: I grew up a comic book geek thanks to my Dad’s extensive collection. I get excited about superheroes, but I also have high standards because I’ve read so much. Superheroes in text form are interesting to me because you get to know the interior world of the characters in a different way than a visual comic—you also get to use your own imagination more.

"The Last Skull" has entirely gripping prose that lets you see everything in your imagination vividly. The [more . . .]

More reviews . . .