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overall 12 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
editor average: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

Children of the Apocalypse by Skyla Dawn Cameron

Passion. Vengeance. Redemption. Sacrifice. Destiny.

From the author of the award winning novel “River” and internet cult hit “Catharsis” comes a serialized novel about the end of the world and the lives of those destined to stop it. Three girls are thrust together by their shared abilities and the roles they are to play in the nearing apocalypse. They are guided only by the mysterious . . .

A partial series, with no recent updates.
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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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SuperMegaNet by Jesse Gordon

Ultimate Collaboration

Four unlikely friends are permanently linked together when they install a beta “ultimate collaboration” tool on their computers—that allows them to teleport to and from each other’s homes at ease. Of course, they get more than they bargained for when they discover they can’t turn their connections off . . . . . . .

A serialized novel, updating sporadically.
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overall 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
no editorial rating

The Exiles Ever After by A.H. Gilreath

Ezra Kettle, a baker down on his luck, is banished to the land far below his cloud-bound homeland for a crime he did not exactly commit. (It involved a beanstalk and a human kid with sticky fingers.) He’d rather avoid all the dangers of the human world and unlock the secrets of his family’s recipes on his own. Instead, he . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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overall 11 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Curio Killed the Cat by Skyla Dawn Cameron

Urban fantasy without the angst...mostly.

Welcome to Curio Killed the Cat—an occult shop in Kensington Market, Toronto. Meet the employees (a lazy hoodoo spellcaster, a feminist succubus, and a snobbish Wiccan priest), their perpetually drunk (and confused) boss, and their strange customers, as they try to keep the shop from closing. . . .

A complete novel.
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not yet rated

Taylor’s Polynomials by Gregory Taylor

Math Equations - Personified.

These are the tales of one particular set of anthropomorphic personifications of mathematical relations. Where the graphs double as the character hairstyles. (Don’t worry, the art quality gradually improves over time.) Expect pop culture references and LOTS of puns and wordplay. There are series’ where the parabola gets kidnapped away from the polynomials (because isn’t Para a conic?), where . . .

A complete series.
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not yet rated

The Red Door by Jaskaran Singh

It’s last call for lost friends, as Jack stages a five year reunion hoping to encounter once familiar faces and see if shared experiences from the past still resonate in the future. . . .

A complete series.
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overall 4 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
editor average: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

Stuck Station by John Crandall

the ongoing sci-fi, action-adventure humor-hyphen-thingy

Containment Facility One is ancient, beautiful, and broken. Built eons ago in a parallel universe, the massive space station keeps the Destroyer—a genocidal and nearly omnipotent alien being—imprisoned. The Destroyer has already devoured all life in countless dimensions, and if he escapes, our universe is next. Unfortunately, the Containment Facility One crew is trapped too. That’s why they . . .

An abandoned novel.
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Random Editorial Review

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CHILDREN OF THE APOCALYPSE

Saving the World

By Jim Zoetewey, editor, author of The Legion of Nothing

Oct 11, 2008: All in all, I’d probably have been more enthusiastic about this story if I’d read it when I was in my teens. I don’t have anything particularly bad to say about it, so let me explain why.

Here’s the plot: The main character, Genevieve, discovers that she and two other girls at her high school have received abilities that could allow them to avert the upcoming apocalypse. Unfortunately, they don’t really know how to use them yet. Also, their mentor, while [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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CHILDREN OF THE APOCALYPSE

Pleasant Little Surprise

By Ziggy, member

Aug 30, 2009: Opener: When I first read the title of Skyla Dawn Cameron’s “Children of the Apocalypse” my first thought was one of dismay. I was assuming that it would be a web novel about teen saving the world and I was right. I also assumed that it wouldn’t portray the teens the way it should. While surprising – though pleasant – I was wrong. Most times when you have someone writing a teen view they focus only on the story not on the teen’s everyday dramas. Especially when the so called [more . . .]

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