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MUSKETEER SPACE

One of my favorite childhood tales, in one of my favorite Genres

By Alexander.Hollins, member

Jan 6, 2015: The tale of the musketeers and their hapless wanna be newb was one I enjoyed as a child, and seeing the tags and description of this serial, I was ready to cringe. I’m all for a gender swap, but it sounded like romance between the quartet was in the air. While a bit of crushing happens, and some mutual partners, the quartet keep things professional, well, as much as a musketeer can, and the story is a DELIGHTFUL romp through futurism and the past.

The tale is told in much the same style and pacing as the original. Many conventions of space opera have been used, and I can see pieces of classic SF sprinkled here and there in ways that warms the cockles of my heart. Looking at her webpage, I was not surprised to learn that Tansy already has a few books under her belt, and I will be hunting them down shortly, as her prose doesn’t dance across the page, it STRUTS. Somehow she manages to keep the story feeling modern, like EE Smith’s lensman series, like pulp 50’s rocketship sci fi, and like the original tale, all the at the same time. READ THIS STORY. You need the laughs.

2 of 2 members found this review helpful.
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SWORN

Editor’s First Impression

By Palladian, editor, author of Super

Mar 23, 2014: I was taken with the premise of this story, that it had sprung from the idea of the sworn virgins of Albania, who have assumed identities as men so that they would no longer be subject to old tribal clan laws, which say that women are the property of their husbands. The story itself is set in another world, however, one that seems to have some little magic to it, and which the author does a good job of introducing readers to, sinking them into the deep end from the start.

One protagonist is Otmakla, a member of the Stoyanjid family who rebels against the marriage that’s been arranged for her to a much older man of the Romjid family. According to the codes of the mountains, this is a great insult and so the members of the Romjid family go to kill all of the young women of the Stoyanjid. Otmakla meets Romial that night, the other main character and a sworn of the Romjid family, who for some reason helps Otmakla to hide rather than kills her.

The main characters are well-drawn in this drama, and I felt the reader got a very good sense of who these two people were, bound by honor and trapped within their family systems of two houses in conflict. Things became more interesting, and more dangerous, as they became friends throughout the course of the story, and the sense of tragedy looming in the future became more and more pronounced, and more immediate.

The writing itself is simple in style but compelling. The author mentioned that English was not their first language, which I could see in the occasional sentence structure or tense confusion, but there did not seem to be so many errors that it impaired my enjoyment of the story. I should add that this story is in its early days (10 chapters posted currently), so keep that in mind if you’re expecting a big backlog. Any prospective readers should also expect a lot of bigotry against the characters and bloody violence described as part of the story.

All in all, I’d recommend this to fans of high drama stories with a lot at stake for the characters. The author has created some fascinating characters in a set of impossible situations, and I am interested to see how it all plays out.

6 of 6 members found this review helpful.
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