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Crowmakers by L. E. Erickson

Automatic weapons, ancient power, and a whole lot of trouble.

The experimental regiment known as the Crowmakers has been ordered to stop native uprisings in the Indiana Territory. The Shawnee prophet Tenskwatawa will do anything to save his people and drive away the encroaching whites. Neither of them are the true danger. Crowmakers takes place in 1806 in a United States that never was, where soldiers use their . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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But An Earlier Heaven by LW Salinas

After an attempt on her life leaves her alone and desperate, the Frankish princess Rigunth makes a deal with a fairy to find two sisters from a legend in exchange for revenge. The daughter of the feared King and Queen of Neustria, Rigunth of Soissons is on her way to marry her betrothed when her bridal train is overtaken . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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A Stillness of the Sun by L. E. Erickson

One last chance for a new first step.

It’s the spring of 1806, and in Philadelphia tales of water ghosts haunt the docks, escalating violence stalks the streets, and news of the larger world brings stories of Indian uprisings from the Indiana Territory.For Kellen Ward and Vincent Bradley, the Indians seem a distant problem. Kellen and Vincent are lovers and dockworkers who’ve built a life together–such as it . . .

A complete novel.
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CROWMAKERS

Interesting alternate history, but..

By Alexander.Hollins, member

Oct 27, 2016: Crowmakers is a take on the events leading up to the battle of Tippecanoe and later Tecumseh’s war. There are two main lead characters, a young soldier who is part of the eponymous Crowmakers (we’ll get to them) , and Wind Man. Wind Man is a white man who was adopted by Tecumseh’s father and raised with Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee Prophet Tenskwatawa. While he provides an excellent cameraman character on the strained interactions between the brothers, I fear that we have a "white savior" trope in the [more . . .]

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