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Black Cloak White Art by A A Roi

Tales from the Wizard's End of the Staff 

It has been eighty years since the since the last Conjunction of the Three Realms and the accompanying Riven War wrecked havok on the world of Aethros. Since then the Wizards of the North have worked hard to reshape thier identities, forge the Alliance of the Thirteen Greater and Lesser Kingdoms and prepare for the next conjunction, barely more than a decade away.

But under the twin suns, one hot one cold, something is not quite right. Greyslan Amberglass, veteran of the last conjunction and one of the masterminds behind the new orders of magic has begun to discover that the plans he helped enact aren’t quite turning out as expected. And the new generations of Wizards have their own ideas of how to defend against inevitable conflict with the worlds above and below.

To uncover these growing conspiracies, he sets out into the new world he helped create, searching for answers and uncovering threats to the lands he vowed to protect. And this starts with the theft of a set of Arcory Stones, created in the last act of his mentor Arcory, Master of Demons, Victor of The Riven War. Where it will end, there is know way yet to know . . . 

Note: Black Cloak White Art contains some graphic violence.


A series

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Listed: May 12, 2012

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Magic and Its Collateral Damage

By Palladian, author of Super

Jul 4, 2012: Upon reading the first ten chapters of Black Cloak White Art, I found there were a number of things that appealed to me about it. The narrator seems intelligent and humorous, as well as being a thinker who’s somewhat at odds with the way his society is set up. He’s been essentially sent on punishment duty, a thankless task that’s probably impossible, yet he soldiers on the best he can. The world of this story seems vast and interesting, and we get to see a bit of it since our narrator is on a journey. The story itself is compelling, as well – there’s a good mix of magic as well as a clear showing of how this magic affect the everyday people living in the blast zone, as it were.

If there were anything I could change about this story, I’d recommend that the author work with an editor. The structure and the motion of the story are good, and much of the writing itself, as well, which is why I kept finding myself bounced out of the storyline as I ran into misspellings, incorrect punctuation, lack of or too much capitalization, or too many commas. It’s mostly the first few chapters for which this is a real issue; as the story progresses, I found fewer of these type of problems, but it made the beginning chapters harder to read than I assume the author wants them to be. Also, though the author seems to know this world well, there were a number of times I found myself wanting more information (like how a number of huge creatures could live somewhere where there doesn’t seem to be anything to eat). This isn’t always a bad thing, because it can make the story mysterious and therefore interesting, but if it happens too often it can be distracting for a reader.

At any rate, I’d definitely recommend that readers who like stories with a medieval flavor and lots of magic, wizardry, and mystery give this story a look. As mentioned, the writer improved notably over the space of a number of chapters, so I look forward to seeing what this author does in the future.

4 of 4 members found this review helpful.
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