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Letters To My Mother by Rebecca Heath

 

Kate is a college junior, a gifted student who skipped two grades in school, a naval officer’s daughter who’s lived in more places than she can remember. Shy and bookish, she’s never had a boyfriend, let alone been kissed or gone on a date. Kate thinks falling in love is something that only happens to other girls.

David is a college professor, a sailor, a brilliant scientist trapped in a failed marriage; he buries himself in teaching and research. David’s convinced that love has passed him by and he’ll go through life with an empty heart.

When Kate gets a campus job as David’s typist, they discover they’re both mistaken. Letters To My Mother is the story of a May-December romance set in 1950s Seattle.

Note: Letters To My Mother contains some graphic sexual content.


A complete novel

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Listed: Dec 27, 2012

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Editorial Reviews

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A 1950’s College Affair, with Sailing

By Fiona Gregory, editor

Jan 2, 2013: Despite the title, this short novel is mainly in first person narrative (as a memoir), rather than letter form. It will transport you to the University of Washington campus in the 1950’s, complete with the culture and mores of the day: Co-eds are required to sign in and out of their dorm and return to their rooms by 11pm; a male student warns Kate "You’ll become used goods!" However, she has her passionate affair with a married professor anyway. The story is told with so much sensitivity, yearning, and realism it seems it must be at least partially autobiographical. It’s about the joy of finding a soulmate, the bittersweet tenderness and pain of a relationship that is right and wrong at the same time, living for the moment and paying the price later, the exasperatingly foolish choices of a young woman overwhelmed by love and obsession.

A nervewracking and powerfully described (to a non sailor) sailing escapade must also be mentioned.

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