overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
editor average: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off

London by Miranda Sparks

She’s coming for you . . . 

In the heart of London stands an ominous building with mirrored obsidian windows. It is here at number 42 that the London branch of the Agency is situated, and where the seemingly endless struggle with their enemies, the Solstice, will begin for another night.

Mirrorfall: London tells the story of Emma, the only female Agent in existence, and a tangled web of revenge plots formulated by men and gods over the course of decades. Navigating her way through an array of conspiracies and lies she soon comes to realise that no one, not even her closest friends, can be trusted.


A novel, no longer online

Tags: · · · · · · ·

Listed: May 2, 2009

Also by this author:

Share:

  • Facebook
  • Delicious
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter

more . . .

Recommendations

People who recommend this story also recommend:

The author of this story recommends:

Member Shelves

Member who recommend this include:

Or view the full list.

Have Your Say!

Request an invite or log in to rate, recommend, review, or bookmark this story.

Note: You can monitor reviews for this listing with its review feed.

Vote for it on topwebfiction.com . . .


Editorial Reviews

the_author() rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off

Should have started with “Mirrorfall”

By Linda Schoales, editor

Oct 29, 2009: “London” is an urban fantasy set in a city patrolled by the super-powered Agency. The Agency protects the citizens from the Solstice, non-humans who congregate in territories where the agents’ powers don’t work. Emma is a fierce, legendary agent who lives to kill the Solstice. Wallace is a new recruit trying very hard to impress everyone enough that Emma will let him work with her.

The story is set in the same universe as “Mirrorfall” and “Mirrorheart”. I haven’t read either story, so I felt a bit lost at the beginning. After six episodes I still don’t know much about the Agency, Emma, or the Solstice. The agents seem to be able to pull things “out of the air” with their thoughts. The first line in the story is Emma thinking “Require: AK-47” and then a gun appears in her hand. The story starts with her creating a pile of enemy bodies. She feels nothing but satisfaction for a job well done because the Solstice aren’t considered human, just “scum”. After reporting in and ordering a team of recruits to clean up the “mess”, she heads off into the night. The next episode is an interesting contrast as Emma visits with a retired agent and her new baby.

The next few episodes move the story back to the Agency where Wallace is trying to impress Emma’s boss Redfern, and the resident geek, Chance. Again, the contrast between this and the dark violence of the first episode is interesting. It reminds me a bit of the beginning of a James Bond movie, although not as witty. However, the way the agents banter and tease the new recruit reminded me more of the beginning of older police buddy films like “The Rookie”. The references to pop culture, like Doctor Who and Torchwood, give it a more current feel.

The writing is solid and there seems to be a complex backstory. So far the few Solstice creatures that have been introduced have been interesting and the villain seems to be appropriately malevolent. However, despite the violence there’s not a lot of tension. After six episodes I still don’t feel engaged in the story or the characters. I did feel sorry for one of the Solstice creatures although I’m not sure I was supposed to.

I suspect I would have enjoyed “London” more if I’d read the previous stories in the series first. As it was, I found it hard to get into the six chapters that I did read. If you like stories about a shadowy agency fighting the enemies that the public aren’t aware of, you may find this series your cup of tea, but I’d advise starting with “Mirrorfall”.

1 of 1 members found this review helpful.
Help us improve!  Request an invite or log in to rate this review.

the_author() rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off

Editor’s First Impression

By Jim Zoetewey, editor, author of The Legion of Nothing

May 2, 2009: I’ve already read it in its entirety and gave it a four mostly as a placeholder because it’s solid at the very least. It’s worth mentioning that it’s connected to the Mirrorverse (Mirrorfall, etc . . . ) which I’ve also read. I don’t know how a person coming cold to the material would do with it.

0 of 0 members found this review helpful.
Help us improve!  Request an invite or log in to rate this review.

Most Helpful Member Reviews

No member reviews yet.

Your review

Request an invite or log in to rate, recommend, review, or bookmark this story.