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Dark Heights by C.D. Miller

A webfiction serial drama that casts uncanny shadows

Strange and terrible things are about to happen in the town of Park Heights. Nothing will be left untouched, no-one will remain unchanged. For Tess Bellamy, who grew up here but could never get away, the coming events will challenge everything she knows about herself, her loved ones, and the people of this town. For Gabriel Majeaux, a world-weary drifter . . .

A serialized novel, updating fortnightly.
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Adventures in Viktorium by Peter von Harten

It's a whole other world!

In the year 1900, a French scientist by the name of Charles DuPont accidentally discovered an uninhabited parallel frequency of reality while running an electrical experiment. By 1906, he had perfected a machine for travel between the two worlds and by 1907, a beacon was constructed to reroute the souls of the dead to the new reality, effectively creating immortality. . . .

A serialized novel, updating monthly.
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The Man Who Made Monsters by L.P. Loudon and Erin Klitzke

There are monsters, and there are the monsters that kill them.

Weston Nielson Chandler went to Chicago to put distance between himself and his father. It might have worked, but Braedon Chandler’s enemies don’t really care what Wes wants. . . .

A serialized novel.
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Scientific Tales by Charlotte Hillebrand-Viljoen

steampunk asteroid city-states

Scientific Tales is a series of stories about steampunk asteroid city-states. It features diverse people, many of whom like science, doing science, amongst other things, in accurate and realistic (that is, realistic for steampunk asteroid city-states) fashion. It looks like this: After Earth burned, the remnant of humanity was contained in the self-sustaining asteroid mining colonies. Carey Atkinson declared . . .

A series.
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Sin Eater by Emma Mohr

Out of desperation to save her dying son, Grace Barnes sells her soul to Lucifer. In doing so, she becomes his sin eater as well as the alpha to a family of hellhounds. She is thrust into a world she never believed existed with Lucifer’s enemies already hot on her trail and a very persistent detective. . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes fortnightly.
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Home of the Brave by Eleanor Roth

The War has come to America...

The war has come to the United States – desolation is everywhere. Neighborhoods have small pockets of civilians, holed up in homes and abandoned buildings, struggling to survive as the war wages on just beyond their front doors. Follow the journey of one group of survivors from Portland, Oregon as they try to make their way in a barely recognizable . . .

A series.
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Volunteer by YppleJax

What if most magicians' illusions...weren't?

Augusta, a lonely young woman mildly obsessed with stage magic, manages to get invited on stage through seeming happenstance. Her life gets tangled with another “volunteer” and she quickly discovers that real magic comes with some serious complications. . . .

A serialized novel, updating sporadically.
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The Human Camera by Moe McLendon

Why would a man abandon his volition to become a camera? How would cinema change if it recorded feelings as well as sight and sound? “The Human Camera” is a book about how people become machines, and machines become people. It takes place sometime in the early 22nd century, and deals with a man who becomes a cinema camera, . . .

A serialized novel, updating monthly.
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Afterlife by Mike Monroe

A free online science fiction/western serial.

The world as we know it is gone. It’s become a vast desert wasteland where you could ride a sand bike for hundreds of miles before seeing signs of civilization. Our cities are long destroyed. Others have risen up in their ashes, but it’s taken thousands of years. A small number of wealthy business tycoons have managed to thrive in . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes fortnightly.
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The World Walkers Collection by K. A. Webb

When magic is used to create worlds unexpected things happen. This is a collection of stories about these unexpected things, the people who deal with them, and why you shouldn’t play with things you don’t understand. Thirteen fae families travel to a new world after using up all the magic within their old world and they attempt to stop . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes sporadically.
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Black Cloak White Art by A A Roi

Tales from the Wizard's End of the Staff

It has been eighty years since the since the last Conjunction of the Three Realms and the accompanying Riven War wrecked havok on the world of Aethros. Since then the Wizards of the North have worked hard to reshape thier identities, forge the Alliance of the Thirteen Greater and Lesser Kingdoms and prepare for the next conjunction, barely more than . . .

A series.
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The Viscount’s Son by Aderyn Wood

‘The Viscount’s Son’ is a fictional blog that tells the story of book conservator, Emma, and her online project—to transcribe an ancient and mysterious text. The trouble is, Emma’s colleague, Jack, believes the medieval ‘diary’ is a fake. Emma decides to translate the text and leave it up to her readers to decide—so what will you think? Follow Emma’s journey . . .

An ongoing blogfic, with new posts infrequently.
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Random Editorial Review

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SUPERSTITION

Looking for Mystery?

By G.S. Williams, editor, author of No Man An Island

Jul 25, 2008: The premise of the story, an occult investigator, leaves a lot of room for plotlines – anything magic/folklore/superstition/voodoo etc. could eventually be used for an episode.

The writing style is crisp and clean, very much reflecting the professionalism of the protagonist, Dashiell Aldridge. Each chapter is well-written and interesting. Given its design and the talent at work, Dash’s adventures could go on endlessly without ever really running out of possibilities.

If I [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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ODD & ENDS

Sometimes weird just to be weird, but worth reading.

By Alexander.Hollins, member

Nov 4, 2016: So, I have this head canon about how Odd and Ends was created. Bear with me here!

Jody Lynn Nye, Terry Pratchet, and Robert Aspirin are at this party, see? And they get REAAAAALY high on some noxious skunk weed and a gallon jug of White Zinfandel, while shotgunning the first fifty episodes of Welcome to Nightvale. After the first live episode, Bob belches rainbows (I told you it was some good shit) and says, SHHHEIT. We should write something like [more . . .]

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