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overall 8 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Railroad Train to Heaven by Dan Leo

The supposed memoirs of Arnold Schnabel, a brakeman/poet recovering from a mental breakdown in the quaint seaside resort of Cape May, NJ, in 1963. . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

Pure Fiction by Kathleen Maher

A collection of Flash Fiction and serial fiction by Kathleen Maher, author of Diary of a Heretic. . . .

A growing collection of stories, updated sporadically.
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not yet rated

Serial Fiction by Kathleen Maher

serial fiction, "James Bond & the Girls of Woodstock"

The story is about an actor who plays James Bond in a (fictional) reboot and his relationship with the sixteen-year-old local girl, Brooke Logan. One summer works as a nanny for his two small children. The next summer, he signs on as James Bond even though he and his exiled wife are divorced. Consequently, Brooke’s mother will serve as the . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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not yet rated

The Asymptote’s Tail by Bryan Perkins

Hundreds of years in the future, when 3D printers provide every luxury we could desire, from food to clothing, entertainment, and beyond, when androids perform what little labor is left necessary in the resulting boon, and when we have no more need for cars, taking electric elevators wherever we want to go, whether it be upstairs, across the country, or . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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Two Small Lives by Suki

Has Suki found love? Part II of Suki's trilogy.

In the grim north of England, unpublished writer-turned-life-model Suki at last gets her first big writing break. At the same time, calamity develops in her personal life. Why can’t things just be easy? As Suki goes on modeling miserably for money in inhospitable artists’ studios through the winter months, her quests for love and meaning evolve into confrontations with life . . .

An ongoing blogfic, with new posts weekly.
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not yet rated

The Grunge Appeal by Grace Deervale

A Serial Novel about Love, Rage, and Mutually Assured Destruction

Set in the distant future, the novel follows seven men and women who plot to assassinate a political figurehead behind an oppressive regime. It is a story of love gained and lost, a story of desperation in poverty, the pervasiveness of violence, and the lengths that young people will go to in order to matter in a world where they . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off

Gone Lawn by Owen Kaelin (editor)

A web journal of new and progressive literature. . . .

An online magazine of fiction, updated sporadically.
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A Small Life by Suki

Struggling poet Suki has taken up life-modelling to make ends meet...

In a run-down northern English town Suki fights a daily battle with self-doubt over her pursuit of a vocation that has brought neither recognition nor fortune. Single once again, wistfully childless, haunted by the spectre of a destitute old age, Suki starts a lonely night-time blog about art, life, love, loss, and getting old alone. This soon engages a loyal . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Commercial Novel by Anonymous

From desperation, art.

An experimental novel combining crass commercialism, reader response, and time-tested themes like love, fear, and desperation. . . .

A serialized novel, with no recent updates.
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overall 8 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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A Town Called Disdain by Dan Leo

A sprawling fantastic tale of the ’60s, supposedly written by “legendary” B-movie director Larry Winchester. . . .

A complete novel.
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And by Edward Picot

Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South, with all the important bits removed.

The house was full of packing-cases. Even the pretty lawn at the side was to pack up, stiffly and slowly, through the bare echoing November. The very robin that her father had so often made, with his own hands, more gorgeous than ever; amber and golden; here, at this bed of thyme, began to speak of carrots. The grand inarticulate . . .

A serialized novel, updating sporadically.
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overall 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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North of Happenstance by Amber Laura

This serial tale will chronicle the lives of three women who form an unlikely, but certainly unforgettable, bond of friendship, love, and forgiveness. Lost, alone, or starting-over, their paths cross—and the story actually begins—in the small (made-up) town of Whestleigh, Connecticut. Here, together, they find themselves . . . by finding one another. In essence, North of Happenstance can best be summed up . . .

A serialized novel.
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Random Editorial Review

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CORVUS

Weblit, in every sense of the term

By Eli James, editor

Aug 30, 2010: "Listen, sugar, some things never change. Once a nigger lover, always a nigger lover. Only now they call them augers."

I have put off writing this review for the longest time. I finished Corvus at the tail end of 2009, and then had a few conversations with Lee, its author, not too long afterwards.

"What did you set out to do?" I asked.

[more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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THE HOLE IN THE WALL

A good short read

By Paul Samael, member

Feb 5, 2014: A good short read, cleverly told from 5 different perspectives but with a dark undertone to it, this reminded me in some respects of Ian McEwan’s "The Cement Garden."

I would have to respectfully disagree with the reviewer who found it hard to follow. Yes, it does require your concentration and you do find yourself re-reading bits to check you "got everything" – but for me, the spareness of the writing was a strength not a weakness. Anyway, it’s free, so [more . . .]

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