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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Rowena’s Page by S. D. Youngren

Mostly-funny short stories about a young woman's life.

Rowena has a mother:     “This is my life, Mom. Not a Jane Austen novel. Not—”     “Listen to me, Miss Independence. He’s a nice young man, but men expect things. Even nice ones, sometimes. He’s going to think that you’re inviting him to do . . . married people things.” Rowena tried to interrupt, but when she opened her mouth nothing came . . .

A series.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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A Few Good Conversations (Well, At Least 10) by Hans Taylor

Alcohol, empathy, and other poisons.

Most years, I think, are skippable. They suffer from this indescribable mundanity, this relentlessly oscillating day in day out. Those years you could summarise in a sentence or two. To say that 2014 was the best year of my life would be unfair to years 1997 through to 2013, and all the years that followed. But it was certainly the . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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not yet rated

Horsey Ashes by Saltyhalibut

A horrible story for horrible people

A narcissistic idiot breaks out of his family home in search of fame and followers. Follow him and his hateable gang on the long road to Calgary as they battle slavery, marital problems, drug addiction, and horrible animal abuse. Somewhere along the line, he also develops superpowers and the ability to talk to ghosts. Based on a true story. My . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes twice weekly.
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not yet rated

Loan Some by Megan McLachlan

It’s been a bad week for Vera. She lost the job she loved as a librarian and ended a comfortable and seemingly reliable relationship. So when her eye catches a job ad for a company that boasts “a library of characters for every occasion,” impulse (and the word “library”) compels her to respond. Shortly thereafter, Vera has accepted her first . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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overall 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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North of Happenstance by Amber Laura

This serial tale will chronicle the lives of three women who form an unlikely, but certainly unforgettable, bond of friendship, love, and forgiveness. Lost, alone, or starting-over, their paths cross—and the story actually begins—in the small (made-up) town of Whestleigh, Connecticut. Here, together, they find themselves . . . by finding one another. In essence, North of Happenstance can best be summed up . . .

A serialized novel.
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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Elan Meets Rafa by The Mice

To free himself from his wealthy father’s demands Elan leaves everything behind to start a new life. He quickly finds that he is ill-prepared for the real world. He meets Rafa–a strong and resilient boy from a poor family, who provides protection for him. With Rafa and many new friends, Elan starts to find a place for himself in the . . .

A complete series.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Price Breaks and Heartaches by Al Bruno III

The somewhat true story of how I barely lost my virginity, almost missed out on true love and nearly lost my mind!

The following story is true- except for the parts I totally made up. The names have been changed to protect the people I loved and to protect me from the people I hated. . . .

A complete series.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off

Dawnwalker by Wes Boyd

College and the years just afterwards are pivotal for many people, having adventures and establishing their lives. It was especially true for Randy Clark and his three girl friends. They are very different people facing very different futures. Can their special friendship survive the problems and distances of the real world? . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 5 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Rocinante by Wes Boyd

Vagabonding in the seventies! The only thing that kept Mark going in Vietnam was his plan to spend some time wandering the country by air, like barnstormers did 50 years before. In the last days before leaving, he acquires a partner—a tall, morose girl named Jackie. They spend months on their aerial oddessy, falling in love along the way while . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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The Next Generation by Wes Boyd

All she ever wanted was to be normal! Her mother considered Judith to be a hopeless invalid that would have to be cared for all her life—but then she finds a boyfriend that doesn’t see her that way. With his help, she learns to be a farmer’s wife and a much stronger person than anyone had ever thought she could . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Uncle Buddy’s House by Dan Leo

Love and lust in Hollywood.

The cautionary tale of Buddy Best, Hollywood hack. . . .

A complete novel.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating offrating offrating off

Runner’s Moon by Wes Boyd

Two kids, a dream, and acres of dogs . . . Josh and Tiffany want to become dogsled racers. They just have to grow up first—and learn about what they’re doing along the way. A follow-on to Busted Axle Road, focusing on Josh and Tiffany’s adventures. . . .

A complete novel.
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Random Editorial Review

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RUNNER'S MOON

Paper Please

By Eli James, editor

Dec 19, 2008: Adam of Penfencer once commented that a vast majority of web fiction in our sphere is of the sci-fi/fantasy genre. I thought about that, and I realized that it was probably due to two things.

For starters, most writers on the Internet today are early adopters – geeks, tech whizzes, people who grew up with a love for the laser gun and the starship.

Secondly, and probably most importantly, stories with a [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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UNCLE BUDDY'S HOUSE

A Perfect Pleasure

By Kathleen Maher, author of Serial Fiction

Nov 28, 2009: Leaving aside for the moment that "Uncle Buddy’s House," offers the most pleasurable and habit-forming dialogue I have ever encountered, the story centers on Buddy Best, a successful director of grade "B" Hollywood movies. His second wife has recently left him for a hilariously affected dramatist and drama teacher, nicknamed, after an especially bad recitation, the Ancient Mariner. Buddy’s house, "the homestead/mance," originally built in 1931 for comedian Joe E. Brown, makes room for Buddy’s grown son, who has found himself suddenly jobless and partnerless; Buddy’s daughter, whom he [more . . .]

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