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My Stupid Journal by Daisy Tannenbaum

Being the candid and unabridged chronicles of Miss Daisy Eudora Tannenbaum, age eleven, of Paddington, New Jersey, currently exiled in Paris, France, author of DAISY AND THE PIRATES. I’m Daisy. Maybe you know me from “DAISY & THE PIRATES.” I’m supposed to be in Sixth Grade now, but I punched some jerk at school and got expelled, so my . . .

A complete novel.
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Steal Tomorrow by Ann Pino

When her parents died in a global pandemic, seventeen-year-old Cassie Thompson thought her biggest problem was finding her next meal. But “Telo” is a virally-transmitted genetic disease that targets adults, and no one is immune. Surviving to adulthood isn’t looking very good as her city succumbs to food shortages, sanitation problems, and gang violence. When Cassie accepts an invitation to . . .

A complete novel.
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Random Editorial Review

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STEAL TOMORROW

A modernized Lord of the Flies.

By Donna Sirianni, editor

Sep 7, 2008: At least that’s what it kept reminding me of: kids without parents trying to survive on their own, managing "tribes" and themselves, trying to fight a feral instinct that is constantly creeping up and threatening their survival.

This is definitely a very interesting story. I would have liked to know more about this disease in the context of the story itself instead of it being alluded to but my understanding is it’s all in the extra material on the site. I [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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STEAL TOMORROW

Not Really Mysterious

By Emma, author of Sin Eater

Aug 31, 2015: When I first went into Stealing Tomorrow, I expected to like it. I liked the idea of it. A teenage girl living in a world where adults die, leaving nothing but children behind. It was enough to intrigue me. Enough to get me to start reading it and to finish it. But I didn’t really like it.

The characters were the main problem. I didn’t like a majority of them, and the two that I did like, ended up dying. Though [more . . .]

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