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K2

Refreshingly Good – Now With More Bubbles!

By illlogicmedia, member

Nov 14, 2013: Reading K2 is, very much for me, like watching a Faulty Towers/James Bond (Sean Connery era of course!) smash up. I, at first expected it to be somewhat stagnant and hard to follow. Much to my surprise, quite the opposite was true. I flew through the first four chapters and with each page I read, I found myself smiling and wanting to read more. Which, I will. The characters are very light and fun for the most part. Easy to relate to and they share in that British dry sense of humor I’ve grown acustomed to loving from childhood. I’m not one to give away spoilers during a review, and I promise not to do it this time either, but . . . there is one sceen that had me scratch my head pretty hard (towards the beginning). I am still confused that the author went "there". Yet he did and now I have to wait further into to the book to figure out why. VERY WELL PLAYED SIR! I recommend this as a very well done out spy novel with some "prommised" horror as well as other twists and turns. The tone and cadence is quick and witty with a fine balance of twists and brain teasers. I thuroughly look forward to finishing this set of books over time. Very entertaining.

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K2

Editor’s First Impression

By Linda Schoales, editor

Mar 13, 2010: The story is split between 6 .pdf files. The first one includes a helpful glossary of military and government abbreviations, and a list of British slang with translations. The story starts with a priest visiting his estranged father on the latter’s death bed. The old man has a secret and a mission for his son.

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COLD HILLSIDE

The brother left behind

By Linda Schoales, editor

Feb 10, 2010: “Cold Hillside” is the story of Simon, a man dealing with the recent death of his brother Giles in a car accident. Simon goes to Giles’ house, once their childhood home, to remember his brother, wrap up his affairs, and to try to make sense of his death.

The story is told in first person and starts with Giles experiencing the car accident that kills him. The narration then switches to Simon being interviewed by a detective while reminiscing about this brother. He remembers incidents from their childhood on the downs near Dorset, an auction they went to, the moment when the phone call came, the funeral, and the visitors afterwards.

The pace of the first 73 pages is fairly slow. There’s lots of description and conversation but nothing much happens “in the present”. I enjoyed reading the stories as Simon remembered his brother because they fleshed out the two brothers and their relationship. I also enjoyed the descriptions of the places and the people. The time shifts in the writing were well-handled and it was always obvious when a “story” was done and Simon was back talking to the detective. The overall feeling was rather languid or numb, as it probably would be after the loss of a loved one. There is a definite sense of loss and being lost as Simon remembers his brother.

After that the story changes. The detective seems to be gone and things start happening that make Simon suspicious. Someone seems determined to make him leave Giles’ house. Simon remembers other incidents in his relationship with his brother that weren’t so innocent. I found the change to be rather abrupt. The writing seems to have changed to being “in the present”, and to being darker. Instead of sepia-toned memories we have hints that Giles was mixed up in something dangerous. The violence is jarring and the mystery seems out of place after the long lead-in. I gave up after 100 pages because I was missing the quiet Dorset countryside.

I’m not sure who to recommend “Cold Hillside” to. On the one hand, it’s well-written and the characters feel like real people. If you like character-driven stories about family relationships you’ll probably enjoy the beginning but the rest may not be your cup of tea. On the other hand, if you’re looking for a mystery or thriller you may be disappointed. The mystery takes a long time to appear and the pace of the first 73 pages is too slow to be “thrilling”.

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