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Commercial Novel by Anonymous

From desperation, art.

An experimental novel combining crass commercialism, reader response, and time-tested themes like love, fear, and desperation. . . .

A serialized novel, with no recent updates.
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And by Edward Picot

Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South, with all the important bits removed.

The house was full of packing-cases. Even the pretty lawn at the side was to pack up, stiffly and slowly, through the bare echoing November. The very robin that her father had so often made, with his own hands, more gorgeous than ever; amber and golden; here, at this bed of thyme, began to speak of carrots. The grand inarticulate . . .

A serialized novel, updating sporadically.
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The Prodigals by Frank Burton

The Prodigals follows the lives of four troubled young men in Manchester – Brian, Howard, Declan and the novel’s anti-hero, Travis McGuiggan. It’s a book about friendship, religion, drinking, cruelty and love. It’s also a book about leaving home and returning. . . .

A complete novel.
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Treasured Vulva by R.E. Greene

Treasured Vulva tells the story of an unnamed man who lives with a woman. He keeps a secret online journal where he writes weekly about his life including his dreams, abuses, and habits. Dark and oddly offbeat, Treasured Vulva is teeming with themes and stirs questions about the nature of devotion, pain, love, and reality. . . .

An abandoned blogfic.
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Random Editorial Review

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Random Member Review

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COMMERCIAL NOVEL

Great Concept, Better Execution

By Chuck S-L, member

Jul 11, 2010: "She needed a story that others could slip into, a story that would overflow its sentences, a story like love."

Metafiction is a hard thing to do right. It’s easy to lose your reader in experimental nonsense or lugubrious faux-Borges prose. When the metafictional conceit is a commentary on the financial reality and dynamics of online fiction, it has even more of a chance to appear crass and ill-tempered. The percentage of low-quality attempts in this genre only make the exceptional [more . . .]

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