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overall 9 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Corvus by L. Lee Lowe

In an alternate present the minds of teen offenders are uploaded into computers for rehabilitation—a form of virtual wilderness therapy. Zach is a homo cognoscens, one of the new humans who can navigate the Fulgrid. Though still a high school student, he is indentured to the Fulgur Corporation as a counsellor. Laura is a homo sapiens. Their story is part . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 11 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Steal Tomorrow by Ann Pino

When her parents died in a global pandemic, seventeen-year-old Cassie Thompson thought her biggest problem was finding her next meal. But “Telo” is a virally-transmitted genetic disease that targets adults, and no one is immune. Surviving to adulthood isn’t looking very good as her city succumbs to food shortages, sanitation problems, and gang violence. When Cassie accepts an invitation to . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Teal by Tanner Helland

Teal Garrison is having a bad week. Green explosions, frightening visitors, and apocalyptic warnings from the school’s creepy new janitor are bad enough . . . and then his family disappears. Alone and answerless, he is left with an agonizing choice: save himself, or fight back at whoever is destroying his life. Teal’s decision ultimately leads him to a place where more than just . . .

A complete novel.
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overall 9 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Chosen Shackles by Shaeor

The screen is running static. Face your shadow.

The future came in devastation, but we bury it in the lights now, to forget. It was better once, they tell us not to say. Now, at the end of our century, we’ve rebuilt. The city neon glows brighter and casts a shadow deeper on the world. This is just the beginning. In the Eastern Pacific, a sickness . . .

A complete novel.
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Random Editorial Review

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STEAL TOMORROW

Post-apocalyptic, but far from disastrous.

By Stormy, editor, author of Require: Cookie

Aug 21, 2008: (Review written after reading chapters 1-2.1)

At this stage, there isn’t much to judge on – the story really is just beginning – there’s obviously a huge backstory (some of which is explained in bonus material).

The style and voice are solid, and there are no pacing problems as yet – the author seems eager to get the plot going as quickly as possible.

[more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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CORVUS

No title

By intergal, member

Jun 16, 2010: Corvus slips between the story of Zach and Laura, and then Zach’s ‘professional’ life with the Fulgrid as a homo cognscens, a new evolution of human that has ‘developed’ special powers at a cost.

Previous reviewers have focused on the high school elements and the developing love story between Zach and Laura, but it would be a mistake to define this as just a high school love story. It may look like Twilight or High School Musical on the outside because [more . . .]

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