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FROM THE JOURNALS OF BENT MAGNUS

Bent Magnus in One Word: Eccentric

By capriox, member

Nov 16, 2009: Bent Magnus is an intellectual, eccentric, wealthy world-traveler modeled on a caricature of an early 1900’s scientist. He’s supposed to be American, but he seems almost British to me; I think because of the eccentricity, air of superiority, class-ism, and general Western-white-man-ism that underlies most of his outlook. The Journals are out-of-order diary entries he makes about his adventures, pet peeves, and pet theories.

There isn’t much of a plot beyond "an intellectual’s intellectual behaves eccentrically, has eccentric thoughts, and goes on eccentric adventures." Actually, this might be another reason that the character comes across as inadvertently British to me: this narration reminds of the type of storytelling found in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, only with much less overarching plot. Without that larger narrative framework, the absurdism in the Journals of Bent Magnus lean towards falling into nonsense.

I found the individual entries interesting to varying degrees, and the overall nuts-and-bolts writing skills were very good. If you enjoy absurdist British storytelling like the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (or that TV show Red Dwarf), this story might be a good fit. For those who prefer a more straightforward narrative or a tale that is driven by character development instead of adventure-of-the-week, you will probably quickly drift away from Bent Magnus.

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the_author() rating onrating onrating halfrating offrating off

FROM THE JOURNALS OF BENT MAGNUS

Bent Magnus in One Word: Eccentric

By capriox, member

Nov 16, 2009: Bent Magnus is an intellectual, eccentric, wealthy world-traveler modeled on a caricature of an early 1900’s scientist. He’s supposed to be American, but he seems almost British to me; I think because of the eccentricity, air of superiority, class-ism, and general Western-white-man-ism that underlies most of his outlook. The Journals are out-of-order diary entries he makes about his adventures, pet peeves, and pet theories.

There isn’t much of a plot beyond "an intellectual’s intellectual behaves eccentrically, has eccentric thoughts, and goes on eccentric adventures." Actually, this might be another reason that the character comes across as inadvertently British to me: this narration reminds of the type of storytelling found in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, only with much less overarching plot. Without that larger narrative framework, the absurdism in the Journals of Bent Magnus lean towards falling into nonsense.

I found the individual entries interesting to varying degrees, and the overall nuts-and-bolts writing skills were very good. If you enjoy absurdist British storytelling like the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (or that TV show Red Dwarf), this story might be a good fit. For those who prefer a more straightforward narrative or a tale that is driven by character development instead of adventure-of-the-week, you will probably quickly drift away from Bent Magnus.

1 of 1 members found this review helpful.
Help us improve!  Request an invite or log in to rate this review.

next »