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The Descendants by Landon "Vaal" Porter

A Comic Book Universe . . . without the pictures.

The Descendants is web serial styling itself after a comic book universe, right down to a format that included minis, annuals and one shot stories. The central plot follows the lives of a group of superpowered individuals (psionics) as they attempt to live together following a betrayal by the organization supposedly meant to protect them. Interpersonal relationships take as . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.
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overall 18 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Curveball by Christopher Wright

One stormy night in New York City, America’s greatest superhero is murdered in his home. Liberty is dead, murdered by his oldest living enemy. The only clue he leaves behind is an encrypted file he sent to his best friend: former sidekick, former arch-enemy, the villain-turned-hero Curveball. One hot night in Farraday City, CB shows up at his favorite . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes monthly.
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Special People by Tim Sevenhuysen

Special people have special problems.

Special People is a fiction project about people with special and unusual powers and abilities. But don’t call them superheroes! The stories are action-oriented and humourous, but definitely not what you’d expect from your average “superhero fiction.” From a human cell phone to a man who can conjure bacon out of thin air, these are unique, interesting characters, special . . .

A partial series, with no recent updates.
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Phantonics by Kyologist

Phantonics is set on the fictional island of Requiem, where these tiny particles known as phantons are floating around which makeup the soul of each and every person. Sometimes these phantons can react to varying events and grant a person unique powers, referred to as Abilities. Adam Grayson, the protagonist, awakens one of these Abilities one night after meeting . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes twice weekly.
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Graves by L. E. Erickson

Using the power of the dead to protect the freedom of the living.

Legally, Daria should turn herself in to Ardica City’s LM4 Processing Agency, which is tasked with ensuring that those with the ability to tap into the energy left behind by the ghosts of the dead will use their abilities only for the good of the people. But despite heavy-handed government measures, the threat of war beyond Ardica’s walls, the manipulations . . .

A complete series.
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Random Editorial Review

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CURVEBALL

Punk rock superhero

By Fiona Gregory, editor

Dec 16, 2012: Doesn’t that sound intriguing?

Instead of reading the first two chapters, you could listen to them in a podcast. I recommend that – Wright has a good reading voice. The debut scene is breathtaking. A man sits in a penthouse apartment, listening to In the Mood over and over. He’s feeling nostalgic. Something is about to happen. He sends an email. Suddenly, assassins attack!

The second chapter is completely different, as we [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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GRAVES

Cyberpunk meets Fantasy.

By Eren Reverie, author of Et Alia

Aug 28, 2015: Alright: I’m going to start by saying that "Graves" is really well written. I didn’t find any gramatical or spelling errors in the entire archive while I was reading, and the descriptions are nicely vivid. On the other hand, the chapters felt a little short and some of the ‘cliffhanger’ hooks at the end of the first couple felt a little abrupt. However, as the story progresses past the ‘getting to know the cast’ stage those seemed to smooth out more.

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