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overall 88 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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The Legion of Nothing by Jim Zoetewey

Not all superheroes are bigger than life

The Legion of Nothing is the story of Nick Klein and what happens when he takes on the identity (and powered armor) of “The Rocket.” Originally his grandfather’s superhero identity, the powered armor comes with a lot of baggage. Ranging from his grandfather’s service in World War II to connections with other heroes (and villains), the past has a . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes twice weekly.  Recommended by Eli James and 1 other member.
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overall 18 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Curveball by Christopher Wright

One stormy night in New York City, America’s greatest superhero is murdered in his home. Liberty is dead, murdered by his oldest living enemy. The only clue he leaves behind is an encrypted file he sent to his best friend: former sidekick, former arch-enemy, the villain-turned-hero Curveball. One hot night in Farraday City, CB shows up at his favorite . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes monthly.  Recommended by Fiona Gregory and 2 other members.
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overall 16 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Shimmer by Miranda Sparks

Not your average hero...

To friends and family there is nothing remarkable about Justin Cade. Seeing only an awkward, sometimes isolated high school sophomore they would never suspect that he lives a double life as Milestone City’s protector: the holographic heroine known as Glimmer Girl. Juggling school, superherodom and his own skewed sense of self Justin starts down the road of transition into . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes sporadically.  Recommended by Jim Zoetewey and 2 other members.
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overall 10 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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The Flying Cloud, R-505 by Paul Gazis

Set in a world of the 1920’s that might have been, this is a tale of airships, adventure, gallant gentlemen, and sultry island maidens. . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes weekly.  Recommended by Linda Schoales.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Dirigible Ditties by Samazing

A variety of short narratives revolving around central storylines, as written by Samazing. Fantasy, science fiction and even a touch of dark humor will feature prominently. Expect violence and intrigue as believabe characters penetrate the mystery and corruption of the author’s mind. . . .

A collection of stories.  Recommended by Sonja Nitschke.
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editor rating 1 vote: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half

53 Ganymede by Amy Notdorft

Welcome to 53 Ganymede Avenue. Enjoy your stay. And watch out for Ginger.

When a young woman shows up at the doorstep of an old Victorian house, she finds much more than she was looking for: A place to stay. A host of eccentric companions. A new city to explore. Inexplicable coincidences. Impossible possibilities. And maybe even a new home. Like a warm drink on a rainy day, 53 Ganymede . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes monthly.  Recommended by Palladian.
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overall 23 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Midnight Moonlight by Eren Reverie

Werewolves, Vampires, Faeries and a sever case of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

Abigail is not afraid of anything in particular. She’s just . . . afraid. All the time. Of everything and everyone. She weaves wild stories to explain her state of perpetual anxiety to the people around her, preferring they treat it as a joke than treat her as a neurotic freak. It’s a plan that works well enough: with a little help from her . . .

A series.  Recommended by Fiona Gregory.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating halfrating off
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Jumping Rings by Lyn Thorne-Alder

They're willing to kneel in order to climb.

In the world of the Circled Plain, most of humanity lives within walled cities, protected from the monsters outside. The cities’ walls are nested, circle within circle within circle, and the richest and most powerful live the deepest in the city. They call the social and economic climb from the outer rings towards the inner the Ladder. The . . .

A partial series, with no recent updates.  Recommended by Palladian.
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overall 41 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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A Grey World by Joe

A Grey World follows Alexis, who has gone all out badass. Yeah, her mom’s an abusive druggie and her father is [classified]. Oh, and school’s no better, having a resident psychopath with a grudge. As a new member of the hitting-people-in-the-head school of therapy, she sets about taking out her problems on the local drug cartel. What could go . . .

A partial series, with no recent updates.  Recommended by Palladian.
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overall 28 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Require: Cookie by Grace McDermott

Suits. Guns. Magic.

A magical thing happened to Stef Mimosa when she was only two: she died and an angel confronted Death to bring her back–or at least that’s how she remembers it. Years later, Stef has traded magic for science, working as a freelance hacker. When a simple coding job turns out to be more than she expected, Stef gets in . . .

A series.  Recommended by Jim Zoetewey and 1 other member.
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overall 8 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Peter and the Vampires by Darren Pillsbury

Peter Normal leaves California and moves into his grandfather’s house with his mother and sister. Upon arriving he discovers that his grandfather’s house looks like something out of a horror movie, that his grandfather forbids him to go into the garden, and that the neighbor boy is a bit off the wall. He also discovers that the undead thing . . .

A complete series.  Recommended by Jim Zoetewey and 2 other members.
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overall 5 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Orbital Academy by Maddirose

Halfway between a silver moon and a green tinged planet, five space stations hang in orbit. The men and women who man those orbitals live a life in constant danger, both from the threats of the dangerous planet below, and from each other. Orbital Academy follows the lives of some of those men and women, their highs and lows, . . .

A complete series.
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Random Editorial Review

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THE LEGION OF NOTHING

Superb

By Eli James, editor

Dec 6, 2008: Let me start off the bat by saying that I have a thing for superhero fiction. I watch Heroes, I read comics (or I used to, until I realized there was absolutely no way I could keep up with characters who never actually died), and I think superhero movies were the best thing to happen to cinema since Citizen Kane. Part of the draw of superhero stories is how fundamental they are: how simple the interplay of light and dark, how human the emotions behind the masks, how basic and [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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DIRGE

Draws you in from the beginning

By WolvesOfCalla, member

Sep 30, 2018: From the first prelude this serial is written in a captivating, page-turning way. It’s darker and spookier than I anticipated, and I’m a fan of all things dark and spooky.

The characters have a breathing three-dimensionality to them that leaves you thinking about them even when you’ve closed the window. Their reactions to the unthinkable terrors they are eventually presented with feel realistic and human, yet their personalities also feel grounded in the dark and tragic world they inhabit.

[more . . .]

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