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overall 3 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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North of Reality by Uel Aramchek

North of Reality is an explorable fiction space updated three times a week that covers a wide variety of unusual topics, from Rubik’s cube-based theology to the anatomy of wishing wells. Each piece within can either be read as an independent work, or as part of a larger cosmology. . . .

A growing collection of stories, updated thrice weekly.
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overall 5 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Adam Maxwell’s Fiction Lounge by Adam Maxwell

Adam’s subject matter tends towards the surreal or at least the very least weird. His writing has been described in the press as a ‘Chandler-esque hard-boiled cocktail, stirred with equal parts humour, mystery, gut-wrenching realism, and trademark minimalism’, ‘weird, wonderful, twisted and witty’ and even ‘almost Fawlty Towers’ which is, unsurprisingly, one of his favourites. His first book, a collection . . .

A collection of stories.
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overall 4 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Denham’s Dentifrice by Phineas Clockword

Tales from the Gallery of All

Phineas Clockword’s uncyclopedic Denham’s Dentifrice aiming to answer overly specific questions. What does a vending machine think? What did the late botanist’s nephew inherit? Is there a demon named Jonathan? Who is the Holy Llama President? What is an unbison? How many pillows did I stuff using my belly-button fluff? Are there more nifty questions? Yes. . . .

A growing collection of stories, updated sporadically.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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flesh phantoms by Alan P. Scott

cynical biped

The stories here are short (some very short) and are mostly sf – that is, speculative fiction: fantasies, myths, science fiction, slipstream . . . all the flavors of fabulation except, I hope, for the mundane. Many were written with the audience of the Usenet newsgroup talk.bizarre in mind, back when text was the thing. —APS . . .

A collection of stories.
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In This Twilight by Al Bruno III

a tale of lost gods and fragile transformations

A world where both dreams and monsters lurk in the shadows, where love and forgotten rituals fight for control of the human heart, and where the madness of eternity can be glimpsed in a single segmented eye. . . .

A collection of stories.
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Peculiar Memories by Jason Macias

Most of the time, my days are as ordinary as the next guy's. Then there are days when something peculiar happens.

Most of the time, my days pass more or less like I imagine the days pass for other people. I work. I enjoy the company of friends. I daydream. I do laundry. Then there are other times when something peculiar happens. Not very often, of course, but frequently enough that I sometimes wonder about these occurrences and what they might . . .

A collection of stories.
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Random Editorial Review

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ADAM MAXWELL'S FICTION LOUNGE

Worth Reading

By Jim Zoetewey, editor, author of The Legion of Nothing

Oct 25, 2008: Writing a good short story is hard.

You’ve got to suggest enough about a character and their situation to get people to care, but if you want it to remain a short story you can’t tell too much.

Flash fiction is harder.

You’ve got even less space to create a plot, the character, or anything else the story needs to work.

[more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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IN THIS TWILIGHT

No title

By NatatBlue, author of The Call of the Seven Peaks

Aug 2, 2015: The writing seems solid, as has been mentioned before, and I would say it has been carefully edited, unlike some internet offerings. If brutally searching for errors, I could find grammatical inconsistencies, but nothing that interfered with reading. The story opens at a high school dance, described with a nice amount of detail. Thelma, our narrator, is neither an outsider nor a prom queen. She, rashly for a daughter of a relatively modern world, goes home with a complete stranger and encounters a bizarre household. I may perhaps be too [more . . .]

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