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North of Reality by Uel Aramchek

 

North of Reality is an explorable fiction space updated three times a week that covers a wide variety of unusual topics, from Rubik’s cube-based theology to the anatomy of wishing wells. Each piece within can either be read as an independent work, or as part of a larger cosmology.

Note: North of Reality contains some harsh language.


A growing collection of stories, updated thrice weekly

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Listed: Mar 21, 2016

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Editor’s First Impression

By Chris Poirier, editor

Mar 21, 2016: It’s nonsense, but it’s really nice nonsense. If you enjoy neat little pseudoscience confections, check it out.

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Most Helpful Member Reviews

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Fun Nonsense and Short-short-fiction

By TCC Edwards, author of Far Flung

Mar 22, 2016: North of Reality is a delightfully eccentric collection of short fiction and entries that may have been taken from the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

There seem to be two main styles of entries on the blog. Some are self-contained pieces of fiction, like the poignant "Then Before If". These pieces seem to play around with physical and metaphysical concepts, making the reader think deeply about time travel and other such possibilities.

Other entries are totally ridiculous Wikipedia-style entries. One such piece is "The Projectile Heart", informing readers that human hearts can eject from human bodies, much like the innards of sea cucumbers.

Unlike most entries on this site, there is no direct connection between different entries. However, as the author says, each entry paints a piece of a larger cosmology – a very weird one!

3 of 3 members found this review helpful.
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