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The Legion of Nothing by Jim Zoetewey

Not all superheroes are bigger than life

The Legion of Nothing is the story of Nick Klein and what happens when he takes on the identity (and powered armor) of “The Rocket.” Originally his grandfather’s superhero identity, the powered armor comes with a lot of baggage. Ranging from his grandfather’s service in World War II to connections with other heroes (and villains), the past has a . . .

An ongoing series, with new episodes twice weekly.
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overall 40 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating off
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Ward by wildbow

The Rules Have Changed

Sequel to Worm, Ward features a change of protagonists and takes place after the events of the first work. Spoilers below. The unwritten rules that govern the fights and outright wars between ‘capes’ have been amended: everyone gets their second chance. It’s an uneasy thing to come to terms with when notorious supervillains and even monsters are playing . . .

A serialized novel, updating twice weekly.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
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Summus Proelium by Cerulean

Cassidy Evans lives in a world of superheroes and supervillains. Born to a rich, prestigious family who genuinely and openly love and care for her, she has never truly wanted for anything. It is, in so many ways, a fairy tale life. But Cassidy is about to learn that fairy tales come at a cost. Witnessing something horrific, something . . .

A serialized novel, updating twice weekly.
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overall 2 votes: rating onrating onrating onrating onrating half
no editorial rating

Origin of Power by Alex W Maher

Mav was eight when a Hellraiser attacked London, turning it into a city of islands. That day his power manifested, and he became a Titan. Ten years later and the world is a different place. More Titans appear every year, ignoring the plights of ordinary people, using their power for their own gain. Tyrants rule the streets, enforcing their . . .

A serialized novel, updating weekly.
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not yet rated

Illusion/Core by R.E. Washington

Am I human or a monster?

Years ago magic entered our modern world and changed everything. Twenty years later, the world has Access Facilities to help budding magic users and the MDE to help manage, police, and control magic. Raven Delias is a normal teenage girl who is getting her Core magic awakened like everyone her age. She just wants to get into a good school . . .

A serialized novel, updating twice weekly.
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not yet rated

Burning Seas by Mark Gardner

In a future vastly different than our own, societies clash in an epic showdown to control the world. . . .

A serialized novel, with no recent updates.
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Random Editorial Review

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THE LEGION OF NOTHING

Superb

By Eli James, editor

Dec 6, 2008: Let me start off the bat by saying that I have a thing for superhero fiction. I watch Heroes, I read comics (or I used to, until I realized there was absolutely no way I could keep up with characters who never actually died), and I think superhero movies were the best thing to happen to cinema since Citizen Kane. Part of the draw of superhero stories is how fundamental they are: how simple the interplay of light and dark, how human the emotions behind the masks, how basic and [more . . .]

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Random Member Review

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WARD

There should be aWards for Webfiction like this

By G.S. Williams, author of No Man An Island

Dec 12, 2017: First some background:

My name is G.S. Williams. Once upon a time I was an editor on the Web Fiction Guide in the founding group, and a writer on "No Man an Island" and then "The Surprising Life and Death of Diggory Franklin". My involvement began to slow around the time my twin sons were born in 2012, which is when I first read Wildbow’s "Worm." I stopped being an editor around then, and stopped writing not long after just because [more . . .]

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